The Survey Results

Rättvik, Dalarna

We have all been there, looking for a new job and being confused by the contradicting advice and tips about what you should be focusing on. How to write the perfect CV, the most impressive portfolio, and engage recruiters with your custom-crafted cover letter…

As someone that arrived in Sweden already in my thirties, I always have the extra layer of doubt, due to potential cultural differences.

With the massive growth of the technology industry, this scandinavian silicon valley needs to import talent from the places where the demand for it is still not as significant. …


Or a guide to being able to be as hipster with CSS as you are on Instagram 😎

Screenshot of a CSS only tilt-shift using a photo from Patrick Tomasso (https://tinyurl.com/s63vk3r)

It’s almost 2020, and web standards have come along more than what most people give them credit for (go forth and spread the good word to your backend friends)! 😇

While implementing my new portfolio site (www.menosketiago.com), I thought with would be cool to have a “frosted glass” effect on my modal veil instead of a duller semi-transparent fading color. Not so long ago, this was only feasible in native applications and via pre-fabricated images and trickery that was always more pain than the gain.

Alas, thanks to the CSS backdrop-filter property, this is now rather easy to do. Unfortunately…


Among the thousands of stars in the milky way of UX articles, one story will froth up above all others — “Should designers learn how to code?”

In case you were wondering… this is still, not that story.

Remix of an illustration by Leandro D’Andrea. Follow him on Facebook or Instagram and buy the original print at Society 6.

If you glimpse at most of the web nowadays it is easy to forget that when HTML was introduced, styling was an illusion and the cascading style sheet was doubly so.

If you glimpse at most of the web nowadays it is easy to forget that when HTML was introduced, styling was an illusion and the cascading style sheet was doubly so.

That is because when HTML sprung to cyber-spatial life in 1989, there was next to no way to change the way your page looked. The text sizes and spacing were defined almost exclusively by the browser you used…


Among the thousands of stars in the milky way of design articles, one story will froth up above all others — “Should designers learn how to code?”

This is, yet again… not that story.

Illustration by Leandro D’Andrea. Follow him on Facebook or Instagram or buy this print at Society 6.

Welcome back to our designer-friendly code spaceship! On our two previous episodes, we looked into the basics of HTML and orbited some of the tools you can use to write code.

Let us now pierce a bit more deeply into the anatomy of HTML elements and the basic structure of a web page.

Attributes, attributes everywhere!

As we have already seen, HTML elements are composed by an opening and closing tag and have content between those (text or further child elements), but we previously skipped other key constituents, called attributes.

Attributes are used to give browsers extra info about the element, they should…


Among the thousands of stars in the milky way of design articles, one story will froth up above all others — “Should designers learn how to code?”

This is, still… not that story.

Illustration by Leandro D’Andrea. Follow him on Facebook or Instagram.

Welcome back to our designer-friendly code spaceship! On our first episode, we looked briefly into the history of the World Wide Web and the basics of HTML.

Today, we will be looking into the means for code galaxy exploration, the tools of your hopefully newfound cosmic trade. There are a couple of alternative tools for those willing to venture out into the void of rendering designs on the browser.

  1. Good old text editors like TextEdit on Mac and Notepad on Windows.
  2. Web-design tools like Dreamweaver and Aptana.
  3. IDEs like Sublime Text, Brackets, Atom or Visual Studio Code.
  4. Code sandboxes like…

Among the thousands of stars in the milky way of design articles, one story will froth up above all others — “Should designers learn how to code?”

This is not that story.

Illustration by Leandro D’Andrea. Follow him on Facebook or Instagram.

This is a story for those fearless souls, who have already decided not spend any more precious moments considering the need, but instead are focusing on what they actually want, to learn a skill set that will not only be extremely valuable but hopefully darn fun also! 🙌

As for what I want, it is simply to be your guide on a perilous but thrilling journey, into a universe full of new discoveries and unpredictable challenges.

Like most stories, this one starts at the beginning…

Ours commences in 1989, more precisely on March 11, when Tim Berners-Lee, a young engineer…


Or the size should you design for… kind of.

I am betting that if you got 10 cents every time you hear the famous “what screen sizes should we design for”, you would be well on the way to becoming a part of the mythical 1% club…

The most common reply is to go check the hippest screen resolutions your users might be visiting your site/web app on, which would give you a couple of measures for artboard sizes, on which to apply your magnifying glass proof, pixel-perfect mockups.

But some years ago, a bunch of folks that design/code websites…


Answering the million kronor question with data.

A panorama from Stockholm’s Norra Riddarholmshamnen, which does not bring us any closer to the answer…

It’s commonly known that Nordic countries are spearheading the way in gender equality in the world and Sweden especially can brag about having the highest score on gender equality within the European Union.

This is due to a number of decade-long policies and efforts around raising social awareness, especially by highly engaged feminist activists.

But it’s also painfully obvious, to anyone that works in tech in Sweden, that this overall equality has not rubbed off on our industry.

In fact, there are plenty of organizations that have taken upon them to do what…

Tiago Almeida

A Portuguese Designer and Unicorn in Training™, living the lagom life in Stockholm, Sweden.

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